FAQ

Click the links below to jump to the FAQs and answers

About Open Access and Opening the Future

1. Why OA and why now?
2. Why now when library budgets are under so much pressure?
3. What happens if a frontlist title has access to other funding such as a BPC from a research grant?
4. Can this model scale for use by other publishers without inundating libraries with lots of tiny deals?
5. Why would a research funder be interested in this programme and how can they get involved?
6. What is the goal of this model?
7. How can revenue targets be reached? And what happens if and when they are reached?
8. Is this program open to library consortia deals?
9. When will you make books open access?

About money and conditions of membership

1. What do subscribing members get for their money?
2. How much do members pay?
3. Will member libraries/institutions have unlimited access to the books in the subscription packages? And what happens at the end of three years?
4. What will be the format of the book subscription packages and what services will be available to members?
5. What if I want access to more than one package?

About the books and collections

1. How have the packages been composed?
2. Will there be any DRM restrictions on the backlist?
3. How will the OA books be made available?
4. Will CEU Press also sell print copies of the OA books? If so, where does the money from these sales go?
5. I already own the backlist titles/don't need access to the books but would still like to support the OA programme. Can I do this?

About the CEU and OtF partners

1. Is the Central European University supporting this programme?


About Open Access and Opening the Future

Why OA and why now?

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that open access in scholarly communications is the optimal solution in a time of severe societal restriction. It seems clear that there is an opportunity to reassess how academic books can reach the world. Even without the context of Covid-19, open access is a benefit to scholars and readers alike - the following list of positive benefits is taken from the OAPEN OA Books Toolkit:

• Increased readership, usage and citation

• Wider and more diverse audiences

• Real-world impact and public engagement

• Quicker and more lasting impact

• More possibilities for readers to engage with and improve research

• Greater author control

• Compliance with funder mandates

During the first phase of Covid 19 many university and commercial publishers made their content open to the world as they rushed to assist students and researchers to gain access to content while libraries were closed. Over the months of mid-March until the end June 2020 CEU Press made 279 titles open to anyone with access to the Internet. Through the Project MUSE platform downloads exceeded 350,000 in 129 countries for books that under the closed model would have sold a couple of hundred copies in hardback. Growth in ebook usage was dramatic.

Back to top of page


Why now when library budgets are under so much pressure?

The Covid pandemic has at once exposed how vital open access is to the future of scholarly communications while also ripping the heart out of the library budgets that can make that transition possible. Opening the Future is designed to be affordable to yield excellent value per book. At an average projected cost of €16.00 per backlist title, €32.00 per frontlist title, or €10.67 per book on aggregate. Whichever way you look at it, Opening the Future provides a good return on library investment.


Back to top of page


What happens if a frontlist title has access to other funding such as a BPC from a research grant?

Our policy is to first seek funding from other sources and only if that is not available (which it is still not in most cases) would we apply the funds raised from this project to make books open.


Back to top of page


Can this model scale for use by other publishers without inundating libraries with lots of tiny deals?

We hope that with the documented success of Opening the Future we will have a model that could lead to the widespread transition of university presses worldwide to OA. This could be something like a publisher ‘shopping mall’ to facilitate support and enable library choice and is being worked on by Work Package 2 of COPIM.


Back to top of page


Why would a research funder be interested in this programme and how can they get involved?

Open access is of clear benefit to research funders, who can then ensure the maximum public impact of the work that they fund. Funders have, in the past, supported other consortial membership schemes in the journal space and we hope that this will translate to books as we seek a more open future.


Back to top of page


What is the goal of this model?

Nothing less than to show a route to sustainable OA for the foundational publications of the Humanities and Social Sciences.


Back to top of page


How can revenue targets be reached? And what happens if and when they are reached?

Revenue targets can be reached as more libraries join up. Once achieved we will reduce the membership fees, or with members’ consent, make more books open access.


Back to top of page


Is this program open to library consortia deals?

Since success in opening all books depends on the income this will be considered but can reflect only the savings in administration and marketing costs. Please contact us to discuss.

Back to top of page


When will you make books open access?
As soon as we have the revenue, the next book to be published will be OA.

Back to top of page


About money and conditions of membership

What do subscribing members get for their money?

Members receive access to a package of 50 titles from CEU Press’s extensive backlist on Central and East Europe and the former Soviet Union - the history of the region dating back to the middle ages, communism and transitions to democracy. There are four packages to choose from but each will contain titles proven by recent download figures to be popular and current according to data from Project MUSE. One package has been curated by an independent panel of subject expert library colleagues. While not a pick and mix model entirely there is sufficient choice for libraries to select what meets their collection and reader requirements best.


Back to top of page


How much do members pay per year?

Library and institutional members are banded according to their size, as recognised by LYRASIS and Jisc. Based on this, our annual membership fees are:

• €1200 high tier, per year

• €800 medium tier, per year

• €350 lower tier, per year

Membership is for a minimum of three years.

Member libraries and institutions will have unlimited concurrent/simultaneous access to all titles in the package they’ve subscribed to during the term of their three year membership. They will be entitled to perpetual access to that package at the end of their three year membership.  You may sign up for access to a separate package at any time - this membership and package access will also be for a minimum of three years. 

Back to top of page


Will member libraries/institutions have unlimited access to the books in the subscription packages? And what happens at the end of three years?

Member libraries and institutions will have unlimited concurrent/simultaneous access to all titles in the package they’ve subscribed to during the term of their three year membership. They will be entitled to perpetual access to that package at the end of their three year membership.


Back to top of page


What will be the format of the book subscription packages and what services will be available to members?

The books in the subscription packages are hosted on Project MUSE in their standard DRM-free, unlimited-use model for ebooks. Content is delivered in chapter-based PDF format. Full-text searching is available across all books and within individual titles. MUSE supports authentication via IP, Shibboleth, and referring URL. Participating libraries will be able to make use of MUSE’s Library Dashboard to access MARC records and KBART files customized to their holdings, and to retrieve COUNTER 5-compliant usage statistics. MUSE collaborates with all major library discovery vendors and will ensure the packages are set up as collections to be activated in all pertinent discovery services. Books on the MUSE platform are preserved through participation in PORTICO’s E-Book Preservation service. Project MUSE is committed to the accessibility of content and complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), in a manner consistent with the Web Accessibility Initiative Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 AA.


Back to top of page


What if I want access to more than one package?

You can sign up to as many packages as you like - simply fill in the form for each package you want access to, or you can always contact us if you want to discuss it first.

Back to top of page


About the books and collections

How have the packages been composed?

The four packages of 50 titles each have been assembled in different ways. The first covers History and is primarily made up of the most accessed titles on the Project MUSE platform. The second is Political Science, again selected by their ranking on Project MUSE. The third, selected by the editors at CEU Press, is wider in subject areas and includes gems in literature, such as the Classics list, gender studies, Roma, labour, public health, nationalities, Jewish studies, human rights and more. The fourth is a package made up of titles selected by a small independent panel of librarians.


Back to top of page


Will there be any DRM restrictions on the backlist?

No, all backlist titles that you are subscribed to will be DRM free.


Back to top of page


How will the OA books be made available?

The new titles funded by the program to be published open access will be hosted on Project MUSE, and OAPEN. OA books will be available in PDF format with CC BY NC ND licenses. Project MUSE supports open access books with MARC records, KBART files, and metadata sharing with major library vendors, to ensure that OA content is widely discoverable through library systems.


Back to top of page


Will CEU Press also sell print copies of the OA books? If so, where does the money from these sales go?

Yes. All OA titles will be available to purchase in print form. The revenue that we need to make books OA is already reduced by the amount that we hope to raise from continuing print sales. Print books can be bought through the normal channels.


Back to top of page


I already own the backlist titles/don't need access to the books but would still like to support the OA programme. Can I do this?

Yes. We appreciate that some institutions may not wish to sign up to a book package, or may not be able to. However they might still want to support, and help to fund, the Open Access monographs that CEU Press will be publishing. For these institutions we have created an ‘OA Supporter Membership’. It is simple and quick to join: just fill in the sign up form with the appropriate details and we’ll do the rest. No further action is required from you once we have processed the payment.


Back to top of page


About the CEU

Is the Central European University supporting this programme and who are the other partners?

The CEU is fully behind this initiative. The University provides a level of financial support/subsidy for its Press that is consistent with other universities and without which this programme would not be possible. This is truly a partnership between the Press, its parent institution and the library community: from subscribing members to platform providers like MUSE, OAPEN and DOAB, and from licence and library experts like Jisc and LYRASIS, to sales agents LYRASIS and Knowledge Unlatched.


Back to top of page